In our weekly spot where we chat about wellbeing and mental health, we just want to have a natter this week about struggling to keep on going.

Hello and welcome to Wellbeing Matters, our weekly spot to have a chat.

Right now, we’re all in some form of lockdown, whether it be full isolation or one that includes going to work, and out and about for provisions when needed. Our world has contracted, our pool of contacts shrunk to those we can wave at virtually, but can’t hug in reality.

It’s hard. It’s hard to find structure to the days, to fill in the blank spaces of community and contact. This isn’t to say that people don’t have things to do. Many are working from home. Others are essential workers. There are carers, sole parents, parents who are trying to both keep working and home educate, reassure and support their children through these stressful times.

It’s also hard to deal with what we can’t do. We can’t visit our elders, hold hands or hug anyone outside our households. Have drinks and de-stress with friends. We can’t hold the hands of the dying, or be with them in their last moments. We can’t observe grief in a natural way, postponing the remembrance of a person’s life until some distant point.

Furloughing, redundancy, rent, bills – the economic problems are deep, from an individual level, right up to government. The news is pessimistic, filled with grief. A 24-hour reel of sadness.

There are many stresses that can cause cracks in our wellbeing. That make the tasks, the day ahead exceptionally hard.

Here at Film Stories, we just want to say we know how hard it is for you out there. That it’s okay to not be okay. Days are long and full of uncertainty. Many people have lost loved ones that were the foundation of their world and aren’t sure how to life carries on without them.

Remember, we can only do our best as humans, and if that means having an uncontrollable ugly cry in the middle of the day, and adding 3 cartons of ice cream to your shopping, then that’s fine. If you need a primal scream from your balcony after six weeks indoors, go for it.

If there’s darkness nipping at your heels and you can’t see beyond the next hour, then please look for someone to catch you. We’re going to leave you some links here, which might be able to give you some help. Please, please ask for it if you’re struggling.

Has anything helped you deal with darker days? Doesn’t matter how insignificant it seems; sometimes it’s the lightest of touches that help in the most unexpected ways. Like the cold push of a dog’s muzzle into your hand. A call or a message from an old friend. Or tracking satellites across the night sky.

Talk to us, shout at us, unburden yourself. Never be ashamed to be human. Collectively, we can get through this. But we can also acknowledge that some days are worse than others. Wherever you are, whatever you are trying to do today, we send you love. You got this.

Take care, and thanks as always for reading. Here are some brilliant organisations who are here too, who may be of help.

Age UK – for older, and those who care for them

Childline – for younger people who may be having issues while in lockdown

CRUSE Bereavement Care – for those that have lost loved ones

Campaign Against Living Miserably – to support younger men struggling

MIND – for those struggling with their mental health

Money Saving Expert – for those with financial problems

National Domestic Abuse Helpline

NHS Mental health app resources 

Rethink Mental Illness – support for those with mental illnesses, and those that care for them

Samaritans – for anyone struggling to get through the day

YoungMinds Matter – for younger people suffering with their mental health and anxiety

Thank you for visiting! If you’d like to support our attempts to make a non-clickbaity movie website:

Follow Film Stories on Twitter here, and on Facebook here.

Buy our Film Stories and Film Stories Junior print magazines here.

Become a Patron here.

See one of our live shows, details here.

Related Posts